1865 Letter from Bernard H. Dinkgrave to James Muse Dabbs

https://louisianadigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/oplib-orv%3A84 This letter was also included in the Dabbs collection. it is a letter written by Bernard Dinkgrave from a hospital in Alexandria. If you want to read a transcript of the letter, just click on "Details". It is quite an amusing read and just a little naughty! "Bennie" would be assassinated a few years … Continue reading 1865 Letter from Bernard H. Dinkgrave to James Muse Dabbs

The History of Benton's Bell Battery

Have you ever wondered how the confederate unit known as Benton's Bell Battery, got it's name? My boss continues to digitize our WPA collection and this was a recent upload. I didn't know we had this! https://www.louisianadigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/oplib-wpa%3A167 As a side note, written on the bottom of the last page is more proof that Stephen Girard … Continue reading The History of Benton's Bell Battery

Solving a Mystery: The Confederate Dead of Monroe City Cemetery

The Confederate Monument in Old City Cemetery             Since I first became interested in Ouachita parish history, I have heard the local story that the Confederate monument in Monroe’s Old City cemetery sits on top of the burials of Confederate soldiers.  Most of them would have come from the Confederate Hospital that was set up … Continue reading Solving a Mystery: The Confederate Dead of Monroe City Cemetery

The story of Edwin Francis Jemison: Louisiana’s Most Famous Boy Soldier

By Unknown - This image is available from the United States Library of Congress's Prints and Photographs division under the digital ID cwp.4a40928.This tag does not indicate the copyright status of the attached work. A normal copyright tag is still required. See Commons:Licensing for more information., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=19521228 His face is haunting.  He stares … Continue reading The story of Edwin Francis Jemison: Louisiana’s Most Famous Boy Soldier

Major Thomas R. Hotchkiss

The following article appeared in the Ouachita Telegraph, Saturday, November 4, 1871, Page 2, Column 4.  I believe Major Thomas R. Hotchkiss' remains were moved in the late 1890's, along with 125 other soldiers to what became the mound the Confederate Monument stands on in the City Cemetery. A HERO GONE TO REST.                    DIED … Continue reading Major Thomas R. Hotchkiss