Unknown Mealy Photo Identified!

The second Mealy photo I won, just felt SO familiar! When I got to work Monday morning, I began thumbing through my transcription of the Monroe Evening News World's Fair Edition newspaper from 1893. Lots of men had the same hairstyle and looked very similar (I'm looking at you policeman Perry McCabe!). It seems this … Continue reading Unknown Mealy Photo Identified!

An Account of the Sinking of the Buckeye, March, 1844 – Part VII

When Dr. Stone told me that amputation was really necessary, I proposed to him to make an examination of it by opening it. he said he would not do it, that it would be cruel in any one to attempt it, and that I could not bear it. This was before the days of chloroform. … Continue reading An Account of the Sinking of the Buckeye, March, 1844 – Part VII

An Account of the Sinking of the Buckeye, March, 1844 – Part VI

Well we were going through swamps, and of course could not have a steamboat, so the Capt. procured an immense skiff, and hired two colored men to row it, and put his steamboat clerk in the stern to steer it. It was large enough to have carried a dozen persons comfortably, whereas we were only … Continue reading An Account of the Sinking of the Buckeye, March, 1844 – Part VI

An Account of the Sinking of the Buckeye, March, 1844 – Part V

But to return to the sad scenes, the Captain of the DeSoto wished to leave the scene of the disaster before some had recovered their dead children. Among others, Mr. Hyams had not found his little girl and sister-in-law, whom he afterwards found in the upper berth of one of the staterooms. He went to … Continue reading An Account of the Sinking of the Buckeye, March, 1844 – Part V

An Account of the Sinking of the Buckeye, March, 1844 – Part IV

My husband told me that in rushing down the cabin of the sinking boat that our child was torn from his arms by the crowd, and he could not recover him as it was impossible for him to stop amid the immense throng. Fortunately he was thrown on to a floating mattress in the cabin. … Continue reading An Account of the Sinking of the Buckeye, March, 1844 – Part IV

An Account of the Sinking of the Buckeye, March, 1844 – Part III

Well I could not raise myself out of the water on to the roof. I did not have strength enough in my arms to raise myself as my clothes were pretty heavy. Some one came and told me to give him my hands. I gave him my right hand but held on with my left. … Continue reading An Account of the Sinking of the Buckeye, March, 1844 – Part III

An Account of the Sinking of the Buckeye, March, 1844 – Part II

I exclaimed, "What is the matter?". He replied, "Bring Frank." I took him out of the berth and awakened the nurse who was asleep on the floor and told her to follow us. (She was a grown woman.) There was an open door leading from the gentlemen's cabin on to the guards. My husband took … Continue reading An Account of the Sinking of the Buckeye, March, 1844 – Part II

An Account of the Sinking of the Buckeye, March, 1844 – Part 1

In the files of the Ouachita Parish Public Library, I found an account of the tragedy of the Buckeye and DeSoto steamboat collision. It was written by Narcissa Grayson Garrett for her grandchildren. Someone in the past typed up the account and gave a copy to the library. The account is absolutely gripping. Over the … Continue reading An Account of the Sinking of the Buckeye, March, 1844 – Part 1