Wisner Colored High School

Wisner Colored High School was one of the earliest African-American high schools in Ouachita Parish. It was founded by the Barrington family right after the Civil War. The Excellence Academy school building sits on the site. This grainy newspaper clipping was recently found and was identified as Pruitt High School, 1915. The distinguished gentleman in … Continue reading Wisner Colored High School

African-American Education in Ouachita Parish Near the Turn of the Century

This is a tiny little key hole glimpse into the history of education in the African-American community of Monroe.  It talks about a trade school that had been started by the local Baptist. The Times-Democrat, New Orleans, LA, May 26, 1902, Page 5     The seventh annual commencement of the North Louisiana Industrial High … Continue reading African-American Education in Ouachita Parish Near the Turn of the Century

Louisiana Freedmen’s Bureau Office Records, Monroe, LA Indentures, Mar.-Nov., 1867

Right after the Civil War, orphaned African-Americans were "apprenticed" to local white families to learn a trade.  The Louisiana Freedmen's Bureau took care of writing up the contracts and were supposed to make sure they were treated fairly.  This is only covers a nine month period, and it makes you wonder what happened to the … Continue reading Louisiana Freedmen’s Bureau Office Records, Monroe, LA Indentures, Mar.-Nov., 1867

Zadoc Harman

Here is another article I wrote for Louisiana Road Trips magazine in June, 2001.  Zadoc Harmon was a fascinating Ouachita Parish character! Zadoc Harman:  Free Man of Color in Colonial Ouachita Parish             Anyone with a passing knowledge of Colonial Ouachita Valley history, knows the names of the early founders of what was to become … Continue reading Zadoc Harman

Miller-Roy Building

The Miller-Roy building is one of the most historically important buildings in Ouachita Parish.  In 1929 two doctors, Dr. Dr. J.C. Roy and Dr. J.T. Miller decided that they needed a place where African Americans could do business without begin discriminated against.  An African-American contractor named J.A. Beckwith was hired in 1929 to build it at … Continue reading Miller-Roy Building

George Byron Hamlet: Monroe’s first African-American mayor

A few weeks ago, I was just playing around on the internet, seeing what was out there by searching prominent names in Monroe's history, and seeing what came up.  I decided to search using George B. Hamlet's name.  Lo and behold, I found a site talking about the role African-Americans have played in the history … Continue reading George Byron Hamlet: Monroe’s first African-American mayor